As parents, we all want our children to live their lives to the fullest potential. For parents of children with learning and behavioural disorders that can affect all areas of a child's life, safe, effective, holistic and supportive treatment without the use of prescription medications is a priority.

Doctors of Chiropractic, Tracey Ladermann, Deborah Leask and Lauren Longstaff provide Paediatric chiropractic care at Eastland that does just that. If you have concerns about your child, please give us a call on 03 9095 7990 to arrange an initial consultation or an informal discussion on how Chiropractic could help.

A Drug-Free Approach

Parents are concerned about psychotropic medications being prescribed for their children with Autism, ADHD and ADD.

Chiropractic enables learning and behavioural problems to be treated holistically and without drugs, by focusing on putting the body's systems back into balance so that mind and body - and all the neuroimpulses flowing between the two are functioning at optimum levels.

Nutrition

At Eastland Family Chiropractic, nutrition is one of the key areas we focus on in a very targeted way. There can be so many dietary related aspects that can cause problems that can all play a part in causing or exacerbating symptoms including:-

  • Deficiencies in Phospholipids, Omega-3 fatty acids, Amino acids, Minerals and Antioxidants
  • Hypersensitivities to foods and/or additives such as Gluten, Casein and refined Carbohydrates

There are many scientific studies and reports online highlighting this crucial area of nutrition. One good example is the report published in the Lancet*¹ in 2011 of a five week study involving 100 children. This found that an elimination diet had 'significant beneficial effects' for 64% of the children and documents the relapse in ADHD symptoms when problem foods were reintroduced.

Other factors could include, exposure to environmental toxins affecting the nervous system as well as heavy metals, agricultural pesticides and chemical solvents.

Retained Neonatal Reflexes

Retained Neonatal Reflexes are another key area in the treatment of behavioural and learning disorders. Incorrect integration or retention of these reflexes that are so vital during birth and in the very earliest part of our lives can lead to many of the symptoms common in ADHD and all Autistic Spectrum disorders.

Specific techniques are used in order to identify the retained reflexes concerned and the number of these involved, before applying gentle, Chiropractic adjustment techniques and other methods to facilitate correct integration and to help each child develop their full potential.

Supporting Evidence for The Effectiveness of Chiropractic Care

A report on Chiropractic care for children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, conducted in 2010 and published on the website of the US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health website, PubMed*², focused on a small group of boys in the 9 - 13 age group who were treated with a combination of Chiropractic manipulative therapy and nutritional supplements.

A fifteen-question ADHD questionnaire completed by parents and teachers of each participant, both before and after the study was analysed. In each case, improvements in the symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness as well as their difficulties with behaviour, emotions and in socializing were noted. It provides supporting evidence for the effectiveness of Chiropractic care for children affected by these conditions.

Benefits of Chiropractic Care for The Whole Family

Having a child with behavioural and learning difficulties can be an enormous strain on family life and affect other siblings. The holistic and supportive treatment provided at Eastland coupled with advice on referral for more help if appropriate, will have enormous benefit for the rest of the family too.

Additional research from Chiro.org and the following reports used in the article:

*¹ http://www.biobalance.org.au/_downloads/lancet-february-2011-adhd-article.pdf

*² http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20451152